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Supervision: Effective Clinical Relationships with your Supervisees
Supervision continuing education Counselor CEU

Section 15
Appendix: Reproducible Client Worksheet
| Supervision
Social Worker CEU, Psychologist CE, Counselor CEU, MFT CEU

For more information about this technique, replay track 1.
Write sample supervisee goals below
Daily goals:

Short-term goals:

Medium goals:

Long-term goals:

Four Ethical Questions to Consider
For more information on this technique, replay track 4.
Bear the following in mind the next time you are faced with an ethical dilemma during the course of supervising. 

  1. Is it right?  This question is based on the theory of ethics that there are certain universally accepted guiding principles of right and wrong.  In the case of supervision, would you consider it ever ethical to conceal a supervisee’s weakness in your annual evaluation?
  2. Is it fair?  This question is based on the theory of justice implying that certain actions are just and other actions are unjust. 
  3. Who gets hurt?  This question is rooted in the idea of attempting to do the greatest good for the greatest number of people.  Some might say, "Many families will be hurt if I recommend this supervisee for a position at this family therapy institute."
  4. What does your instinct say?  Although it may sound cliché, following your gut feeling can help you through many a sticky ethical situation

For more information on this, replay track 4.
Review the following list of areas in which a supervisor should be educated.

  1. Providing information for supervisees to obtain proper informed consent.
  2. Identifying errors made by supervisees.
  3. Overseeing supervisees’ efforts to develop and implement thorough treatment and intervention plans.
  4. Knowing when supervisees’ clients need to be reassigned, transferred, or have their treatment terminated.
  5. Knowing when supervisees should arrange for consultation.
  6. Monitoring supervisees’ competence and addressing any issues concerning incompetence, impairment, and unethical behavior.
  7. Monitoring proper boundaries between supervisees and their clients.
  8. Reviewing and critiquing supervisees’ case records and paperwork.
  9. Providing supervisees with regularly scheduled supervision.
  10. Documenting supervision provided.
  11. Maintaining proper boundaries in relationships with supervisees.
  12. Providing supervisees with timely and informative performance evaluations and feedback.

For more information on this list, replay track 5.
Review the following list of skills most applicable in the exploration stage of therapy.

  1. Asking questions that led to the situation the client now finds him or herself.
  2. Seeking clarification on statements that may seem unclear.
  3. Reflecting content in communicating your understanding of the factual or informational part of the message.
  4. Reflecting feelings in communicating your understanding of the feelings expressed by the client.
  5. Reflecting feeling and meaning by using the format "You feel this emotion because of this situation."
  6. Partializing is used to break down several aspects and dimensions of the person-issue-sitatuation into more manageable units to address them more easily.
  7. Going beyond what is said to extend slightly what the client has actually said according the supervisee’s empathic understanding of the client.

For more information on this list, replay track 6.
Review the following list of conflict avoiders.

  1. Importance.  Have you ever thought that the issue was not important enough to discuss?
  2. Time Constraints.  Did you ever use the excuse that there was not enough time to sufficiently cover the entire issue?
  3. Avoiding being "anal".  Did you ever wish to appear rational over appearing "nit-picky"?
  4. Waiting it out.  Did you ever hope that "Time will take care of it"?
  5. Gunnysacking.  Have you ever been guilty of "Gunnysacking"?  This means to pile up grievances as if in a gunnysack and carrying the sack slung around your shoulder.
  6. Smoothing over.  Do you gloss over any conflict that might arise and emphasize the strong areas?
  7. Small sighted.  Do you focus on the details to avoid addressing the big issues?
  8. Being PC.  Do you avoid conflict out of politeness?
  9. Impartiality  Did you ever think that confrontation will hurt your objectivity towards your supervisee?
  10. Aggressiveness.  Do you instead attack your supervisee?

Interview Session Checklist (Exploration)
For more information on this technique, replay track 6.
Rate your supervisee’s interviewing skills in the exploration stage according to the following checklist. A one indicates that you strongly disagree, a two that you disagree, a three that you agree, and a four that you strongly agree.

  1. Supervisee can effectively use the skill of asking questions.
  2. Supervisee can effectively use the skill of seeking clarification.
  3. Supervisee can effectively use the skill of reflecting content.
  4. Supervisee can effectively use the skill of reflecting feelings.
  5. Supervisee can effectively use the skill of reflecting feeling and meaning.
  6. Supervisee can effectively use the skill of partializing.
 
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